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Pictures: Philippines storm toll rises to 35 (Straitstimes)


Millions of people in the Philippines were on Wednesday bracing for a ferocious tropical storm that had already claimed 14 lives and submerged vast tracts of land in more remote parts of the country. -- PHOTO: AFP

MANILA – TROPICAL storm Nock-ten dumped heavy rains across mountainous regions of the northern Philippines on Thursday, raising fears of more fatalities as the death toll rose to 35, with 25 missing.

Although Nock-ten passed into the South China Sea on Thursday morning, it continued to cause major problems in the remote north after causing a series of deadly landslides and floods across the main island of Luzon this week.

Nock-ten, which slammed into the east of the country on Tuesday, had claimed 35 lives, with another 25 people unaccounted for.

The latest recorded fatalities, two policemen and two government workers, were buried by a landslide in the north on Wednesday.

Earlier this week, the storm capsized boats and caused floods and landslides in large parts of Luzon, and forced the government to close schools in the capital of Manila and surrounding areas.

Storm signals have now been lowered as the storm moved further away from the country, the weather station said. However, Nock-ten has intensified in strength, packing maximum winds of 120kmh as it moves north-west, the weather authorities added.

Children play in a creek connected to San Mateo River in Manila on July 27, 2011. Millions of people in the Philippines were bracing for a ferocious tropical storm that had already claimed 19 lives and submerged vast tracts of land in more remote parts of the country. Nock-ten, named after a Laotian bird, was following an erratic course, the state weather service said. -- PHOTO: AFP

A boy takes a bath on a creek connected to San Mateo River in Manila on July 27, 2011. Millions of people in the Philippines were bracing for a ferocious tropical storm that had already claimed 19 lives and submerged vast tracts of land in more remote parts of the country. Nock-ten, named after a Laotian bird, was following an erratic course, the state weather service said. -- PHOTO: AFP

Philippine National Police remove fallen trees Wednesday, July 27, 2011 which were toppled at the onslaught of a slow-moving storm Nock-ten in Legazpi city, Albay province in northeastern Philippines. Nock-ten unleashed massive floods and landslides Tuesday in northeastern Philippines killing at least 14 people with 9 more missing and several towns isolated, officials said Wednesday. The storm is expected to make a landfall Wednesday in Quezon province, south of Manila. -- PHOTO: AP

Residents crowd an evacuation center Wednesday, July 27, 2011 after fleeing their flooded homes at the onslaught of the slow-moving storm Nock-ten in Legazpi city, Albay province in northeastern Philippines. Nock-ten unleashed massive floods and landslides Tuesday in northeastern Philippines killing at least 14 people with 9 more missing and several towns isolated, officials said Wednesday. -- PHOTO: AP

Standed motorists and passengers try to find alternative route from a flooded highway after a river overflowed in Daraga town, Albay province, south of Manila on July 26, 2011, causing floodings due to heavy rains brought about by tropical storm Nock-ten. Nine people were killed and 25 went missing as the tropical storm struck the Philippines, causing floods and landslides that forced tens of thousands to flee their homes, officials said July 26. -- PHOTO: AFP

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In this photo taken Tuesday July 26, 2011, motorists negotiate a portion of a highway following a landslide brought about by heavy rains from the slow-moving storm Nock-ten (local name Juaning) in Legazpi, Albay province in northeastern Philippines. Nock-ten unleashed massive floods and landslides Tuesday in northeastern Philippines. -- PHOTO: AP

Filipino women carry their babies under the rain as they cross a street in suburban Manila, Philippines on Tuesday July 26, 2011. Tropical storm Nock-ten, locally named Juaning, has entered the country, causing suspension of classes up to the high-school level in some parts of the country, including the capital of Manila. -- PHOTO: AP

Residents wade through a flooded street after a heavy rain caused by typhoon Nock-ten in San Juan city, east of Manila on July 26, 2011. One person drowned while thousands fled their flooded homes as a tropical storm hit the Philippines, causing heavy rains and rough seas that disrupted aviation and shipping, officials said. -- PHOTO: AFP

 

http://www.straitstimes.com/BreakingNews/SEAsia/Story/STIStory_695642.html

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Thủy tinh vỡ: Freelance writer
Age: Bính Thìn
Location: Hồ Chí Minh

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